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Running Wheels - Rodents Motor Activity Measurement

Product Code:1800/50

Running wheels provide a convenient method for measuring rodent motor activity over long periods of time.

Used for research on circadian rhythms, motor function, aging, energy balance and obesity.

Robust mouse and rat models measure rodent activity across time. Easy monitoring, low maintenance. Models available with an LCD counter and can also be connected to a Windows PC. Data can be collected from up to 12 wheels simultaneously.

Model
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Background

  • Running (also rotating/activity) wheels provide an easy, convenient method for measuring laboratory mice or rats motor activity over long periods of time. Especially useful for research on circadian rhythms or motor function as well as aging, energy balance and obesity.
  • Recently, it has become more common to investigate physical activity using both running wheels as well as general cage activity in succession (Pistilli et al., 2011). This enables direct comparison between the two methods. 

Robust, automatic count, optimized for tracking

  • Measures rodent activity across time. Models available for mice or rats.
  • Robust, low maintenance set up for easy monitoring.
  • Stainless steel wheel with Teflon bushing selected for low friction and smooth operation. The wheel is housed in a standard clear polycarbonate cage for easy viewing and tracking. A stainless steel wire lid with specially designed locks is fastened securely to the cage body.
  • The cage lid incorporates a lodging for a water bottle holding up to 500ml (not included) and U-shaped food hopper pellets. A secure stainless steel lid covers the opening at the edge of the activity wheel.
  • Revolutions of the activity wheel are automatically counted by the LCD counter (which operates with an extended-life battery). Available with selected models.
  • Operates as a standalone instrument and also connects to a PC, where you can measure activity across time on up to 12 wheels using your preferred data acquisition software – simply add our optional Multifunction Interface NG.
  • Optimized for use with video tracking software such as the popular ANY-maze (optional extra).

 

Feature

Benefit

Easy monitoring, easy maintenance

Quick results, low costs

up to 12 wheels can be connected to Multifunction Interface

Can measure activity across time

Optional printer with internal memory and PC software

Stand-alone or PC-connected 

 

General 

Material

Clear Polycarbonate Cage and Stainless Steel Wheel

Activity Counter

LCD display

Rat Wheel

35cm diam., 2mm bars, placed 8.8mm apart

Mouse Wheel

25cm diam., 2mm bars, placed 7mm apart

Connection to PC

Via optional Multifunction Interface

Physical

Animal Mouse Model Rat Model

Dimensions

37(h)x26(w)x35(d)cm

48(h)x32(w)x47(d)cm

Weight

5Kg

7Kg

Shipping Weight

7Kg

11Kg

Warranty

Warranty  Running Wheel is covered by a 12-month warranty + 12 after product registration
UB-Care  Additional UB-Care can be added for other 12 or 24 months

 

The Activity Wheels are designed to provide an easy and convenient method for measuring motor activity over long periods of time in laboratory rodents.
Especially useful for research on circadian rhythms or motor function, when connected to a data-collecting interface.

Product

1800

Rat Activity Wheel, complete with polycarbonate cage, magnetic switch and LCD revolution counter

1850

Mouse Activity Wheel, complete with polycarbonate cage, magnetic switch and LCD revolution counter

1800-S

Rat Activity Wheel, complete with polycarbonate cage & magnetic switch, without counter, for connection to external interface

1850-S

Mouse Activity Wheel, complete with polycarbonate cage & magnetic switch, without counter, for connection to external interface

Options

52610-BUNDLE

Multifunction Interface for up to 12 running wheels including software

52651 Custom Adapter and cabling

60000-IO

ANYmaze software for Activity Wheels

 

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